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How to install the USBASP driver for programmer

The most cost-effective way to program an ATmega/ATtiny MCU that’s not embedded in a development board such as the Arduino is to buy yourself a USB in-system programmer (ISP).
A USBASP driver is based on the libusb-win32 driver; and supports 32 and 64 bit windows. It is partially signed which means windows still produces a warning during installation, but that warning does not prevent installation of the driver.
OK, we are going to now for the installation procedure…
First you need to download the driver from

After downloading the driver, you will get the zip file under which various drivers are available for different windows so that we can chose according our platform.

In this tutorial we are showing how to installed USBASP driver in WIN7/8/8.1/10 respectively using the following mentioned steps.

Note: – For the users of WIN8/8.1/.10 we want to mention that before installing the USBASP driver they need to disable the device signature enforcement by clicking below.


1. Connect the USBASP programmer to Computer/Laptop via USB Cable & USB Connector.

2. When we will connect the USBASP Programmer then the pop-up will come on screen which showing window try to detect & install the USBASP driver automatically by window update. After few seconds it shows driver failed to install or no driver found message will display.

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3. After this point. Just go the device mange by right click on my computer & find the USBASP icon with yellow icon marked on it. It shows that your system detect the USBASP Programmer but driver on found till yet.
right click on my computer>device manger>select the USBASP.

 

4. Right Click on yellow mark USB-ASP icon & select Update Driver Software.

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5. After Click on it, you will get pop-up window which shows two options: – 1 search automatically. 2 Browse the driver from system.

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In first option if internet is connected with your system then you can go with first one but it takes lots of time that’s why here we chose second option.
6. Select the Browse My Computer For Driver Software, After that window will appear in which you need to select the folder where you unzip the downloaded driver. In the unzip driver folder go to the bin>win_driver>libusb_1.2.4.0. Select the libusb_1.2.4.0 folder.

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7. At this point you will get the window security alert with the message “Windows can’t verify the publisher of this driver software”. So don’t get panic just select install this driver software anyway. It just a way warning message.

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8. Then you will get the message in the end driver has been installed successfully & yellow marked icon on USBASP in device manager is removed & USB Icon shows there.

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How to disable the driver signature enforcement in window 8 & Window 10

During the installation of USBASP Driver in Win8/8.1/10, we face the problem of driver signature enforcement as shown below.

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This because 32/64-bit versions of Windows 10 and 8 include a “driver signature enforcement” feature. They’ll only load drivers that have been signed by Microsoft. To install less-than-official drivers, old unsigned drivers, or drivers you’re developing yourself, you’ll need to it.

we are trying to explain the simplest way to disable driver signature enforcement in Windows8/8.1/10, but bear in mind that this method will only disable driver signature temporarily. After you restart your computer driver signature will automatically turn itself on.

To disable driver signature enforcement do the following:
1. Press & hold down shift key from your keyboard & click on restart button in window. This restart will go to you in Boot Menu.

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2. Blue screen appears with options, you need to select the Troubleshoot options

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3. Then, select the Advance options.

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4. Now, Click on Startup Settings.

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5. Click the Restart button to restart your PC into the Startup Settings screen.

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6. Now After few Second it will take to restart into startup setting, there you need to press F7 button from keyboard to Disable Driver Signature Enforcement.

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Your PC will boot with driver signature enforcement disabled and you’ll be able to install USBASP drivers by using

 

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How To Assemble The Robot

Hey…! When we try to assemble the robots then there is always so many questions & confusing about mechanical components, that how to assemble the robot, how we can use it in our robot, how we can apply to this to make robot, what will be the exact location of components & so on…

Here we try to solve all this problems which occurs during the assembling the robot by using picture representation & steps.

Kindly follow the following step to make good robot as mentioned below:-

Step : 1-  Connect the motors to the clamps with the help of screws as shown in following picture….

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Step : 2- Tight the screws as shown in picture with the help of screw driver

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Step  : 3-  Fix the motors on the chassis cum motor driver board as shown by the in following pictures.

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Step : 4-  Fix both the wheels to the motors ….

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Step : 5- Tight the screws as shown in picture….

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Step : 6- Fix the caster Free Wheel in the Board…like this

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Step 8-   Fix the  Development Board on the chassis board ( In this tutorial we use the EnGeniusLab Atmega8 Bootlader Development Board but same process we can proceed towards the other EnGeniusLab Robotics Board like ATmega8 Mini, Motor Driving Board, Atmega16 Board, 8051 & PIC microcontroller boards also according to holes matching with respected to chassis.

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Step : 9- Now put the Sensor on  Development board (ATMega8) as shown in figures…

 

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Step : 10- Connect the Wires

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India’s First ‘Emotionally Intelligent’ Miko Robot for Kids

In India buy a companion robot for their child? That’s the question that Mumbai-based startup Emotix is trying to answer today, with a bot it has built called Miko. The little robot can talk to children, and play with them, but at Rs. 19,000 it’s not exactly cheap. Gadgets 360 went to the Emotix office in Mumbai to meet Miko for ourselves, and get a better understanding of what the company is attempting.
 
Miko’s design reminded us a bit of Eve, the robot from the movie Wall-E. Unlike Eve, Miko obviously can’t fly, and gets around with its three wheels instead. The bot has LEDs on its sides, and these glow in different colours depending on what it is doing. If its battery is low, the LEDs glow red, and similarly the colours change to show you when Miko is talking, listening, or dancing.
Miko can talk to children who are at least five years old and it encourages them to speak to it by saying things like, “Ask me something.” It will respond to general knowledge questions, and answer queries on basic maths, or do fun things like tell stories or sing a song a song – just prefix your request with “Hey Miko”. Miko also tells children not to litter around, among other things. It can even play games such as book cricket with children.
 
Miko doesn’t need Internet for many of these features – it can play a game, or even hold a basic conversation offline, though answering general knowledge questions will of course need it to be online.
 
Having a companion robot like Miko could seem like a far-fetched idea for people living in India, but the reality is that many parents don’t get to spend enough time with their children. Emotix feels that even when the child is alone at home, a robot like Miko could be quite useful. However, that’s not necessarily what doctors say.

Sadia Saeed Raval, founder and chief psychologist at Mumbai-based Inner Space Counselling Center, says, “We haven’t used this robot so I don’t want to dismiss it out of hand. Having said that, it’s still a machine and it’s not a substitute for humans and human interaction.” Raval feels that children these days don’t spend enough time with people and gadgets like these could lead to them being in a more isolated environment. “It’s much better to ask children to spend time in a common space with other children. Even pets are great for children’s mental health,” she adds.

Even so, this is a space attracting a lot of interest, as we’ve seen with the launch of Mattel’s Aristotle bot, and Lego’s robot making toolkit for kids. Mattel’s bot is due to ship sometime mid-2017.

miko robot

These bots could help you do simple things like alert you when a baby starts crying, and be a kid’s companion when parents are not at home. For example, Aristotle can read your child bedtime stories, sing lullabies, as well as answer questions. With Miko, Emotix hopes to provide companionship to children, though they recognise that it’s not a one-size fits all solution.

Housed in a relatively small office behind a children’s school in the southern part of Mumbai, Emotix’s premises offer the company an easy way to test its robot. The school is just one of the few places where the company has been testing Miko, according to Sneh Vaswani, one of the co-founders of Emotix. Vaswani is an IIT-Bombay graduate, just like co-founders Prashant Iyengar and Chintan Raikar. The trio has been designing robots since their days in college and Vaswani says they’ve participated in robotics competitions in India and abroad.

Having worked on Miko for over two years, the company is now ready to ship the first iteration of the robot in February 2017. “In India, a social robot is completely unheard of. We conducted a lot of pilots with consumers and kids (to determine whether Miko has a market in India),” Vaswani tells Gadgets 360. “There was an engineering pilot to decide the engineering architecture of the product. There was an option that we could have a camera on this (robot) and content streamed to a tablet. We could have a mobile phone placed on it and it could have two wheels.”

The team ended up scrapping a whole bunch of ideas to arrive at Miko as it exists today. Vaswani says, “We had an AR/ VR headset element to the experience but parents told us they don’t want a headset strapped to their child’s face.” Similarly, parents were vehemently opposed to the idea of having a camera on Miko and voiced their concerns about it making the robot feel like a spy.